Facts About Chronic Prostatitis | Buttpillow.com

Chronic prostatitis is pelvic or perineal pain without  evidence of urinary tract infection lasting longer than three months. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) classifies prostatitis into four syndromes. This article discusses the four prostatitis syndromes listed in the medical research and by the NIH.

What is Chronic Prostatitis?

Chronic prostatitis is pelvic or perineal pain without  evidence of urinary tract infection lasting longer than three months.  
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) classifies prostatitis into four syndromes.

Prostatitis Syndromes:

  1. Acute bacterial prostatitis;
  2. Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP)
  3. Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CNP) also called Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS);
  4. Asymptomatic Inflammatory Prostatitis (formerly known as Prostatodynia) 
The greatest number of cases of prostatitis have no known cause, despite chronic inflammation (1). 

 Acute Bacterial Prostatitis

Acute Prostatitis is when your prostate gland becomes enlarged and tender suddenly.  
Acute Prostatitis is usually caused by the same bacteria that cause urinary tract infections or sexually transmitted diseases.  

Patients with Acute Bacterial Prostatitis have:

  • sudden onset of urinary frequency (abnormally frequent urination),
  • urgency (a sudden urge to urinate),
  • nocturia (urination more than two times during the night), and
  • dysuria (painful urination) associated with
  • fever and chills,
  • low back pain,
  • perineal pain,
  • generalized malaise, and
  • varying degrees of bladder outlet obstruction. 
Some men with acute bacterial prostatitis require hospitalization (2).  

Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis

Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis can develop from acute bacterial prostatitis. 

Symptoms are variable and include:

  • dysuria (painful urination) ,
  • frequency (abnormally frequent urination),
  • nocturia (urination more than two times during the night),
  • ejaculatory pain, and
  • discomfort in any area of the perineum or external genitalia.  
The prostate is usually tender and patients usually have a history of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). 
This syndrome is difficult to treat.  Surgery is the treatment of last resort as impotence and incontinence are both possible results (2).  

Chronic Non-Bacterial Prostatitis

Non-Bacterial Prostatitis has clinical symptoms and physical findings similar to those of chronic bacterial prostatitis; however the patient does not have a history of recurrent UTIs.
Treatments that occasionally help include hot sitz baths, and avoidance of alcohol and foods that aggravate the problem (2).   

Asymptomatic Inflammatory Prostatitis (formerly Prostatodynia)

The patient with Asymptomatic Inflammatory Prostatitis (formerly Prostatodynia) does not have inflammation and will not benefit from a trial of antibiotics.  
Patients with Asymptomatic Inflammatory Prostatitis (formerly Prostatodynia) have no history of a documented UTI. 
No infectious agent can be located in the cultures, and there is no inflammatory response in the prostatic secretions.  
It is important to clinically eliminate all extra-prostatic causes for the symptoms, such as interstitial cystitis, carcinoma of the bladder, and other conditions that could cause pelvic pain.   
Usually this chronic disorder remains undefined despite repeated investigations and treatment (2).  

References:

  1. Meares EM. Prostatitis and related disorders.  In:  Walsh PC, Gittes, RF, Perlmutter AP, Stamey, TA, Eds.  Campbell’s urology.  Philadelphia, Penn:  WB Saunders Co, 1986:868-85.
  2. J. Curtis Nickel, MD, FRCSC, Prostatitis Syndromes, “A continuing enigma for the family physician,”  Canadian Family Physician, Vol. 37:  April 1991

Musculoskeletal Disorders Listed | Buttpillow.com

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are also known as Cumulative Trauma Disorders (CTDs) and Repetitive Motion Disorders (RMDs), and Overuse Syndromes, as well as Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSIs). Following is a list of some of the most common musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) seen in office workers which can be called by any of the other names mentioned in this excerpt.

Need for Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders

Up to 85 percent of the population will suffer from musculoskeletal pain and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).

When workers sit or stand incorrectly, specifically in a posture that is not ergonomically correct for the individual, they can experience musculoskeletal pain and MSDs.

Because musculoskeletal pain and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a major source of suffering, health care, and utilization of compensation, there is a definite need for prevention (1). Continue reading “Musculoskeletal Disorders Listed | Buttpillow.com”

Tips to Minimize Risk of Low Back Pain | buttpillow.com

This document contains tips to minimize your risk of developing low back pain while standing, while bending, lifting, and carrying and while sitting and lying. The classifications of low back pain are also listed.

Prevalence of Low Back Pain

Chronic back pain, often with associated leg pain, is the most common medical complaint in developed countries, (Bigos, et al. 1994).  Headache is its only peer (Lawrence, 1977).  (1)

Tips to Minimize Risk of Low Back Pain while Standing:

“Posture techniques that help avoid lower back pain,” are listed below. (2)

  • Maintain good abdominal tone;  keep abdomen flattened while standing.
  • When prolonged standing is necessary, place one foot on a step for a few minutes.
  • Wear cushion-soled shoes for prolonged standing.

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Neck and Shoulder Pain

Neck and Shoulder pain are common among men and women. Younger and younger individuals are suffering with neck and shoulder pain. Preventative measures must be taken. Lumbar and pelvic position should be considered when control of cervical posture is desired to relieve or prevent neck pain. Use of a forward-slanted seat surface has been shown to reduce risk factors for neck and shoulder pain since it helps the sitting individual keep their cervical (neck) and lumbar (low back) spine aligned while seated. The risk factors for and causes of Neck and Shoulder pain that are outlined in the research are listed. Preventative measures for the development of Neck and Shoulder pain that are outlined in the research are also listed.

How Common is Neck and Shoulder Pain? 

A review of the medical literature from 1966 to 1997 showed that the one-year prevalence for neck and shoulder pain was 29 percent for men and 40 percent for women (1).

Can I Prevent Neck and Shoulder Pain?

It is necessary to take preventative measures.

Ergonomic aspects of the preventative measures should include:

  • Appropriate worker selection with sufficient training and instruction
  • Ergonomic design of workplaces
  • Ergonomic considerations in work organization (2)

Ergonomic Training Should Start Early to Minimize Risk of Neck and Shoulder Pain

Neck and shoulder pain are major problems in modern society.

With the increased use of computers and stationary designed workplaces, younger and younger people are faced with cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs) and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the neck and shoulders.

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How Can I Prevent Wrist Pain from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Information about what Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is and what causes Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Also includes information about: How to Sit to minimize your risk factors for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome; How to Hold your Wrists to minimize risk factors for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome; and How to Work to minimize your chance of developing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

How Can I Prevent Wrist Pain from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

To reduce risk factors that lead to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, consider the following:    

“Your desk and chair must be considered as a unit.”

What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, according to Taber’s Medical Dictionary, is defined as:  

“A repetitive motion injury causing pain or numbness that affects some part of the median nerve distribution of the hand and may radiate into the arm.”

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a cumulative trauma disorder (a/k/a musculoskeletal disorder) that affects the nerves.  

Continue reading “How Can I Prevent Wrist Pain from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?”

Dyspareunia | Painful Intercourse

Dyspareunia is defined as genital pain that occurs before, during or after intercourse. This is a common sexual problem. Dyspareunia can occur in women and men. Some sources estimate dyspareunia occurs in two-thirds of all women. The medical literature does not quantify the number of men with this condition. Vaginal infections or infections of the prostate are the most common successfully-treated causes of dyspareunia.

What is Dyspareunia?

Dyspareunia (difficult mating) is defined as genital pain that occurs before, during, or after intercourse.

Continue reading “Dyspareunia | Painful Intercourse”

How to Minimize Risk of Developing Pressure Sores | Buttpillow.com

A healthy person can develop a pressure sore in 6 to 12 hours. While 63 percent of patients who sit for unlimited periods of time develop pressure sores, only 7 percent who sit for maximum periods of 2 hours develop pressure sores. Although there are several intrinsic (within the body) risk factors for pressure sores, there is only one extrinsic (coming from outside the body) risk factor for pressure sores: Pressure. Cushions can be used to reduce external pressure. Studies show it is best to change posture frequently and use a medium density, open-cell foam cushion that envelops the buttocks to minimize external pressure.

A Healthy Person can Develop Pressure Sores in 6 – 12 Hours

“A healthy individual can develop pressure sores in six to twelve hours if left undisturbed in the same position, (Hargast, T., 1979; Staggs, K., 1983; Torrence, C., 1981).” (2)

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Ergonomic Design

Discussion of ergonomics and ergonomic design to minimize risk factors for the development of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs). Also includes discussion of OSHA Standard 29 CFR Part 1910 to explain the benefits of prevention of MSDs and CTDs to employers and employees. Prevention of musculoskeletal pain is also relevant to individuals who spend a lot of time social networking, gaming, or blogging.

What is Ergonomics?

Ergonomics is the science of fitting jobs to people, including anatomy, physiology, and psychology. 

What is Ergonomic Design? 

Ergonomic design is the application of this body of knowledge to the design of the workplace (i.e., work tasks, equipment, environment) for safe and efficient use by workers. 

Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) 

Up to 85 percent of the population will suffer from musculoskeletal pain.  

Ergonomic Design for Prevention of MSDs

Musculoskeletal pain is a leading cause of health-care visits, particularly in primary care, sick absenteeism, and early pensions. . .Thus preventing disability and high-cost cases may result in large economic savings (2).  

Until prevention is granted more resources, programs need to be relatively cheap; and this suggests incorporating them into existing practice routines (2). 

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Hemorrhoids in the Western World

Hemorrhoids are much more prevalent in the Western World compared with “Third World Countries.” Hemorrhoids are associated with constipation, heavy physical work, and the effects of erect posture. Hemorrhoids are common during pregnancy. In addition to hemorrhoids, industrialized countries are at an increased risk for colorectal cancer. If you suspect you have hemorrhoids, always talk to your doctor. Do not self-diagnose!

Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are one of the most frequent problems people in westernized countries face. There are estimates of up to 75 to 90 percent occurrence rates of hemorrhoids in the U.S. population (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). 

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Epidemic of Low Back Pain from Forward Bending

Frequent forward bending while sitting or standing is a risk factor for low back pain. The Buttpillow-Original (TM) and Butpillow-Ergo (TM) are embodiments of the Patented “Ergonomic Seating Cushion” which can minimize risk factors for the development of low back pain while sitting.

 

LOW BACK PAIN FROM FORWARD BENDING

In this study, a motion analysis system was used to measure the amount and velocity of lumbar spine and hip motion during forward bending.

The authors begin by citing the following previous findings:

Epidemic of Low Back Pain

“Disorders of the low back have reached epidemic proportions, (DeRosa, C.P., 1992).”

Lost Work Time | Workers’ Compensation Claims from Low Back Pain 

“Epidemiologic studies show that billions of dollars are spent annually on the problem of low back pain, which is one of the most commonly-cited problems for lost work time in industry and Workers’ Compensation claims, (Chase, J.A., 1992; Frymoyer, J.W., 1988; and Pope, M.H., et al., 1991).”

Frequent Forward Bending Causes Low Back Pain

“Researchers have shown an association between frequent forward bending and low back pain, (Berquist-Ullman, M., et al., 1977; Magora, A., 1973; Mellin, G., 1986; Punnett, L, et al., 1991; Svensson H.O., et al., 1989; Videman T., et al., 1989).”

 

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