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The Buttpillow™️ Patented “Ergonomic Seating Cushion”

The Buttpillow™️ “Patented Ergonomic Seating Cushion” has a hidden wave-form cut-out that elevates the peri-anal area for individuals suffering with hemorrhoids, vaginal pain, dyspareunia, and prostatitis. It has an ergonomic wedge shape to help sitting individuals maintain the natural curve of the spine (lordosis) to minimize risk factors for low back pain, and pelvic pain. It is made with medium density open-cell foam, topped with soft density open-cell foam for maximum buttock envelopment and pressure reduction to minimize risk factors for the development of pressure sores, DVT, varicose veins, and sciatica.

Is All This Sitting . . . A Pain in the Butt?

The Buttpillow (™) is designed to relieve and prevent pain and problems while sitting.

Sit on The Buttpillow (TM) . . . “Patented Ergonomic Seating Cushion”

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The Buttpillow (TM) Patented “Ergonomic Seating Cushion” at Google Patents
  • The Buttpillow (™) “Patented Ergonomic Seating Cushion” is made with medium density open-cell foam topped with soft, convoluted foam for maximum pressure reduction;
  • The Buttpillow (™)  has a hidden “wave” peri-anal and tailbone cut-out made out of medium density foam AND an oval peri-anal cutout made out of soft convoluted foam to minimize risk factors for hemorrhoidal pain, vaginal pain / prostate pain and tailbone pain;   
  • The Buttpillow (™) has an ergonomic wedge shape to maintain the natural curve of the spine while seated (lordosis) to reduce risk factors for low back pain caused by sitting.

Relieve and Prevent Pain & Problems While Sitting!

  • Low Back Pain
  • Tail-bone Pain
  • Sciatica
  • Hemorrhoids
  • After surgery
  • After childbirth
  • Prostate Pain
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Pelvic/vaginal Pain
  • Varicose veins
  • Pressure sores
  • Deep vein Thrombosis

Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women and Men | Buttpillow.com

Chronic pelvic pain occurs in women and men. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) includes women in their definition while the European Association of Urologists (EAU) includes women and men in their definition of chronic pelvic pain. Chronic pelvic pain is a bladder pain syndrome that occurs in women and men and the urological pain syndromes in men include Chronic Prostatitis / Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome. Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndromes specific to women are listed and Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndromes specific to men are listed and are termed urological pain syndromes.

Chronic pelvic pain has two different definitions:  

Chronic pelvic pain as defined by gynecologists’ (ACOG) applies to women only. 

Chronic pelvic pain as defined by urologists’ (EAU) includes both women and men.

The European Association of Urologists (EAU) guidelines distinguish between gynecological, gastrointestinal and musculoskeletal pain syndromes.

Continue reading “Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women and Men | Buttpillow.com”

Facts About Chronic Prostatitis | Buttpillow.com

Chronic prostatitis is pelvic or perineal pain without  evidence of urinary tract infection lasting longer than three months. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) classifies prostatitis into four syndromes. This article discusses the four prostatitis syndromes listed in the medical research and by the NIH.

What is Chronic Prostatitis?

Chronic prostatitis is pelvic or perineal pain without  evidence of urinary tract infection lasting longer than three months.  
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) classifies prostatitis into four syndromes.

Prostatitis Syndromes:

  1. Acute bacterial prostatitis;
  2. Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP)
  3. Chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CNP) also called Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS);
  4. Asymptomatic Inflammatory Prostatitis (formerly known as Prostatodynia) 
The greatest number of cases of prostatitis have no known cause, despite chronic inflammation (1). 

 Acute Bacterial Prostatitis

Acute Prostatitis is when your prostate gland becomes enlarged and tender suddenly.  
Acute Prostatitis is usually caused by the same bacteria that cause urinary tract infections or sexually transmitted diseases.  

Patients with Acute Bacterial Prostatitis have:

  • sudden onset of urinary frequency (abnormally frequent urination),
  • urgency (a sudden urge to urinate),
  • nocturia (urination more than two times during the night), and
  • dysuria (painful urination) associated with
  • fever and chills,
  • low back pain,
  • perineal pain,
  • generalized malaise, and
  • varying degrees of bladder outlet obstruction. 
Some men with acute bacterial prostatitis require hospitalization (2).  

Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis

Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis can develop from acute bacterial prostatitis. 

Symptoms are variable and include:

  • dysuria (painful urination) ,
  • frequency (abnormally frequent urination),
  • nocturia (urination more than two times during the night),
  • ejaculatory pain, and
  • discomfort in any area of the perineum or external genitalia.  
The prostate is usually tender and patients usually have a history of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). 
This syndrome is difficult to treat.  Surgery is the treatment of last resort as impotence and incontinence are both possible results (2).  

Chronic Non-Bacterial Prostatitis

Non-Bacterial Prostatitis has clinical symptoms and physical findings similar to those of chronic bacterial prostatitis; however the patient does not have a history of recurrent UTIs.
Treatments that occasionally help include hot sitz baths, and avoidance of alcohol and foods that aggravate the problem (2).   

Asymptomatic Inflammatory Prostatitis (formerly Prostatodynia)

The patient with Asymptomatic Inflammatory Prostatitis (formerly Prostatodynia) does not have inflammation and will not benefit from a trial of antibiotics.  
Patients with Asymptomatic Inflammatory Prostatitis (formerly Prostatodynia) have no history of a documented UTI. 
No infectious agent can be located in the cultures, and there is no inflammatory response in the prostatic secretions.  
It is important to clinically eliminate all extra-prostatic causes for the symptoms, such as interstitial cystitis, carcinoma of the bladder, and other conditions that could cause pelvic pain.   
Usually this chronic disorder remains undefined despite repeated investigations and treatment (2).  

References:

  1. Meares EM. Prostatitis and related disorders.  In:  Walsh PC, Gittes, RF, Perlmutter AP, Stamey, TA, Eds.  Campbell’s urology.  Philadelphia, Penn:  WB Saunders Co, 1986:868-85.
  2. J. Curtis Nickel, MD, FRCSC, Prostatitis Syndromes, “A continuing enigma for the family physician,”  Canadian Family Physician, Vol. 37:  April 1991

Musculoskeletal Disorders Listed | Buttpillow.com

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are also known as Cumulative Trauma Disorders (CTDs) and Repetitive Motion Disorders (RMDs), and Overuse Syndromes, as well as Repetitive Strain Injuries (RSIs). Following is a list of some of the most common musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) seen in office workers which can be called by any of the other names mentioned in this excerpt.

Need for Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders

Up to 85 percent of the population will suffer from musculoskeletal pain and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs).

When workers sit or stand incorrectly, specifically in a posture that is not ergonomically correct for the individual, they can experience musculoskeletal pain and MSDs.

Because musculoskeletal pain and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a major source of suffering, health care, and utilization of compensation, there is a definite need for prevention (1). Continue reading “Musculoskeletal Disorders Listed | Buttpillow.com”

Tips on Pushing While Delivering a Baby | Buttpillow.com 

Some tips on pushing while delivering a baby by Darren Salinger, M.D., OB/GYN.

Tips for pushing to effect a natural delivery.

There are only two ways to deliver a baby: 

  1. A natural delivery, or 
  2. Cesarean section.  

Sometimes even after a long time of pushing, a person may need a cesarean delivery.   

Continue reading “Tips on Pushing While Delivering a Baby | Buttpillow.com “

Tips to Minimize Risk of Low Back Pain | buttpillow.com

This document contains tips to minimize your risk of developing low back pain while standing, while bending, lifting, and carrying and while sitting and lying. The classifications of low back pain are also listed.

Prevalence of Low Back Pain

Chronic back pain, often with associated leg pain, is the most common medical complaint in developed countries, (Bigos, et al. 1994).  Headache is its only peer (Lawrence, 1977).  (1)

Tips to Minimize Risk of Low Back Pain while Standing:

“Posture techniques that help avoid lower back pain,” are listed below. (2)

  • Maintain good abdominal tone;  keep abdomen flattened while standing.
  • When prolonged standing is necessary, place one foot on a step for a few minutes.
  • Wear cushion-soled shoes for prolonged standing.

Continue reading “Tips to Minimize Risk of Low Back Pain | buttpillow.com”

Dr. Salinger Says…

This article written by Darren Salinger, M.D. OB/GYN contains information about what to expect during pregnancy. It discusses medications that can be used as well as those to be avoided during pregnancy. Also included are food and diet tips. Conditions such as constipation, heartburn, back pain, and pelvic pain are discussed and recommendations are given. These questions are the most commonly asked questions by patients that are answered by Dr. Salinger.

Pregnancy 

The changes that take place during the short span of human pregnancy are profound.  Many of these changes occur soon after fertilization and continue throughout the entire pregnancy.  Most of these incredible adaptations are in response to the growing fetus and the hormonal changes the fetus produces in its mother.

Changes…Start at 4-5 Weeks of Pregnancy

Most women will notice subtle changes as early as four to five weeks of pregnancy.

The first changes to be noticed are:

  • Breast tenderness (sometimes with nipple discharge);
  • Heightened sense of smell (your favorite food or perfume may be intolerable);
  • Nausea with or without vomiting (this is called morning sickness, but often this problem can occur throughout the day);
  • Increased frequency of headaches;
  • Increased frequency of heartburn; and
  • Pelvic cramping or tenderness.

Usually these conditions go away spontaneously around 14 to 16 weeks of pregnancy.

Continue reading “Dr. Salinger Says…”

Neck and Shoulder Pain

Neck and Shoulder pain are common among men and women. Younger and younger individuals are suffering with neck and shoulder pain. Preventative measures must be taken. Lumbar and pelvic position should be considered when control of cervical posture is desired to relieve or prevent neck pain. Use of a forward-slanted seat surface has been shown to reduce risk factors for neck and shoulder pain since it helps the sitting individual keep their cervical (neck) and lumbar (low back) spine aligned while seated. The risk factors for and causes of Neck and Shoulder pain that are outlined in the research are listed. Preventative measures for the development of Neck and Shoulder pain that are outlined in the research are also listed.

How Common is Neck and Shoulder Pain? 

A review of the medical literature from 1966 to 1997 showed that the one-year prevalence for neck and shoulder pain was 29 percent for men and 40 percent for women (1).

Can I Prevent Neck and Shoulder Pain?

It is necessary to take preventative measures.

Ergonomic aspects of the preventative measures should include:

  • Appropriate worker selection with sufficient training and instruction
  • Ergonomic design of workplaces
  • Ergonomic considerations in work organization (2)

Ergonomic Training Should Start Early to Minimize Risk of Neck and Shoulder Pain

Neck and shoulder pain are major problems in modern society.

With the increased use of computers and stationary designed workplaces, younger and younger people are faced with cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs) and musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the neck and shoulders.

Continue reading “Neck and Shoulder Pain”

How Can I Prevent Wrist Pain from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Information about what Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is and what causes Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Also includes information about: How to Sit to minimize your risk factors for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome; How to Hold your Wrists to minimize risk factors for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome; and How to Work to minimize your chance of developing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

How Can I Prevent Wrist Pain from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

To reduce risk factors that lead to Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, consider the following:    

“Your desk and chair must be considered as a unit.”

What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, according to Taber’s Medical Dictionary, is defined as:  

“A repetitive motion injury causing pain or numbness that affects some part of the median nerve distribution of the hand and may radiate into the arm.”

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is a cumulative trauma disorder (a/k/a musculoskeletal disorder) that affects the nerves.  

Continue reading “How Can I Prevent Wrist Pain from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?”

Dyspareunia | Painful Intercourse

Dyspareunia is defined as genital pain that occurs before, during or after intercourse. This is a common sexual problem. Dyspareunia can occur in women and men. Some sources estimate dyspareunia occurs in two-thirds of all women. The medical literature does not quantify the number of men with this condition. Vaginal infections or infections of the prostate are the most common successfully-treated causes of dyspareunia.

What is Dyspareunia?

Dyspareunia (difficult mating) is defined as genital pain that occurs before, during, or after intercourse.

Continue reading “Dyspareunia | Painful Intercourse”